Do you feel like a fraud at work?

Click on the links below to jump to any of these stories:

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE: If you have ever been plagued by the feeling that you are a fraud, you might be experiencing imposter syndrome. Here, we look at the types of people who are prone to imposter syndrome and what they can do about it. 

HEADSPACE: A REVIEW: Have you seen the mini-series Headspace Guide to Meditation on Netflix? Created by the popular meditation app, Headspace, it explains the science behind meditation and why you should pick it up. Read on to find out what we at The Pill think about it!

PICTURE OF THE DAY: More research has emerged showing that Botox can help with the treatment of depression, but how does it work, and is it safe?

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE

The Big Idea:
If you have ever been plagued by the feeling that you are a fraud, you might be experiencing imposter syndrome. Here, we look at the types of people who are prone to imposter syndrome and what they can do about it.

It’s like playing Among Us, but IRL

Have you ever been sitting in the office and been plagued by the feeling that you’re a just little kid who doesn’t belong there, and everyone’s going to figure out that you’re a fraud any second? Or maybe you feel like you’re super behind all of your peers and colleagues and anything you’ve achieved so far has just been luck.

If either of those situations sounds familiar to you, you might be experiencing what is known as imposter syndrome. But you’re not alone — it’s estimated that a whopping 7 out of 10 people experience imposter syndrome at some point in their lives.

Why do we get Imposter Syndrome?

While imposter syndrome can strike anyone at any time, there are certain predicting factors when it comes to who it might affect or when it might come about.

If you’re a perfectionist, a workaholic, or a high-achiever, you’re more likely to experience the self-doubt that comes with imposter syndrome. It has to do with the high expectations we set for ourselves, and the negative way some of us react to not meeting those expectations.

We’re also more prone to imposter syndrome when we find ourselves in a new environment — a new job or a recent promotion can trigger feelings of inadequacy, especially if we’re expecting to do really well right away in our new positions.

How to erase your self-doubt

Studies show that imposter syndrome has a negative effect on job performance, and is linked to increased anxiety and depression. So what can you do to fight back against all that self-doubt?

  • Focus on your achievements.
    Silence the naysayers inside your brain by focusing on the facts. You are the reason you’re where you are today — it’s not luck or some weird mistake. It’s your hard work and skills that got you this far.
  • Know your triggers.
    If you know that a new job or a new project is likely to stir up those pesky feelings of self-doubt, you’ll be more prepared to face them and work through them.
  • Have a support group. Remember that you aren’t the only one feeling this way. If Michelle Obama can have imposter syndrome, then so can you.
SNIPPETS

5 Singaporean stories to catch up on

1️⃣ Powering through life: Sharlynn Ooi is a personal trainer who overcame her eating disorders and became a bodybuilder.

2️⃣ Protestor problems: 3 people have been arrested for holding a protest against transphobia outside the MOE building.

3️⃣ Worried about vaccine side effects? Integrated Shield Plans will now include coverage for hospitalisation resulting from COVID-19 vaccination complications.

4️⃣ Vaccines for all: Vaccination centres are set to be open in all HDB towns by the end of March 2021.

5️⃣ Sufferers of asthma and eczema, beware! Doctors warn that the recent changes in our weather could cause flare-ups.

And 5 facts to spice up your life:

1️⃣ Afternoon siestas: Research shows that napping can be good for your body and your mind.

2️⃣ Two is better than one: Dr Anthony Fauci has officially endorsed double-masking to protect against the coronavirus.

3️⃣ Scared of needles? Worry no longer with the invention of microneedle patch tests that can detect antibodies and more without any pain on your end.

4️⃣ Music in his bones: Last year, a man in the US confused doctors when they heard music on their Doppler, in addition to his heartbeat.

5️⃣ Seeing the light: A 78‐year-old man in Israel is seeing for the first time in 10 years after the world’s first successful artificial cornea transplant.

HEADSPACE: A REVIEW

The Big Idea:
Have you seen the mini-series Headspace Guide to Meditation on Netflix? Created by the popular meditation app, Headspace, it explains the science behind meditation and why you should pick it up. Read on to find out what we at The Pill think about it!

Netflix and chill (literally)

“Our lives are filled with distraction, filled with stimulation. Imagine if there were a way to slow things down, for our mind to unwind and our body to let go of our stress.”

Those are the opening words in the first episode of Headspace Guide to Meditation, the recently-released Netflix mini-series on how and why you should meditate. It’s created by Headspace, one of the most popular meditation apps around, and narrated by Headspace co-founder and former Buddhist monk, Andy Puddicombe.

For an immersive experience

If there’s one word to describe the Headspace Guide to Meditation, it would be ‘immersive’. The animated visuals are simple but do a great job of drawing you in, and the (super zen) music and soundscape (think ASMR breathing and stuff) just work

The first episode introduces you to meditation in general, and later episodes focus on more specific goals like dealing with stress or anger, being kind, and letting go. The guided meditation exercises at the end of each episode are great for beginners and are really well-executed, with the ever-forgiving Puddicombe reminding us every so often that it’s alright if we get distracted and guiding us back into a meditative state.

Not all just feelings and backed by science

For years, research has been rolling in to show that meditation and mindfulness can do wonders for both the body and the mind. Headspace Guide to Meditation is an effective way to engage those who don’t already use the Headspace app and aren’t too interested in listening to one of the many mindfulness and meditation podcasts around. 

If you find yourself wanting to delve further into the art of meditation after watching the series, download the Headspace app for yourselves on the App Store or Google Play! A free Basics course is available to all, and if you’re really committed to making meditation a part of your life, then go ahead and subscribe to access even more content.

SHOWER THOUGHTS

Weird & Wonderful

  1. Meditation is slowly downloading a software update for yourself.
  2. You can get a full body, 1:1 scale tattoo of any person who is the same height as you or shorter.
  3. If someone is allergic to peanuts and you put peanut butter on a knife and stab them, it will cause poison damage.
  4. Papercuts are a tree’s last act of revenge.
  5. Calling a generation “Gen Z” implies that we don’t intend to have future generations.
PICTURE OF THE DAY

From Pixabay, a digital illustration of a lip augmentation.

The Big Idea:
More research has emerged showing that Botox can help with the treatment of depression, but how does it work, and is it safe?

Lifting the body and the mind

We all know that Botox is used to get rid of wrinkles and make people look younger, but did you know that it can also be used to fight the effects of depression?

Scientists used to think that this was caused by a disruption in the feedback loop that reinforces negative emotions when Botox is injected into the forehead. But new studies have shown that it doesn’t really matter where in the body the Botox is injected.

So far, no one really knows why it helps with depression, but more research is being done right now, so we might just uncover the truth sometime soon.

The Swiss Army Knife of medicine

Botox has grown increasingly popular in the past few years, with younger women undergoing preventative Botox, and men joining in with the “Brotox” trend. But aside from its use in cosmetic procedures, Botox can also be used to treat migraines, urological disorders, excessive drooling, and more.

A note of caution

Botox is actually a compound known as Botulinum Toxin — yes, toxin. It works by paralysing or weakening muscles or blocking specific nerves. So while it’s shown to have positive effects beyond its intended cosmetic uses, there is such a thing as too much Botox, which can cause paralysis and even death in large doses. It’s also notable that in the US, Botox is often used for procedures that aren’t FDA-approved. But as long as you’re being treated by a licensed medical professional who knows their stuff, you’re probably going to be okay. 

Thinking about getting a lift? It will probably just be for your face, and not your mental health, but check out our guide to Botox Costs in Singapore anyway!

Vanessa

Vanessa is a go-getter and knowledge-seeker with way too many hobbies. On weekends, she can be found enjoying a lie-in and pretending she doesn't have anything else she should be doing.